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Spring Cleaning! Care and Cleaning of Hand-hooked Rugs, Part I

Spring is a great time to take stock of our faithful old hooked rugs, and to spruce them up for another year of warmth and comfort in our homes. This is an easy process, just a few things to keep in mind.

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Hand-hooked rugs can benefit from occasional vacuuming, but you always want to give a quick check top and bottom, to make sure there haven’t been any snags. If you find any, take a minute to re-hook before you vacuum.

Vacuuming will remove most of the surface material, as well as any grit that can get down and grind away at the fibers. But you might be surprised how much you can brighten your rug with an easy scrub.

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Set of lovely old area rugs. The one on the right has been washed, the one on the left hasn’t.

In William Winthrop Kent’s book, The Hooked Rug (1923), he told the story that pioneer folks would wait for a good powdery snow to wash their rugs. They’d take the rugs outside, throw snow on top, sweep it off, then bring the rugs inside to dry. So you don’t need a whole lot of water, just enough moisture to remove the dirt clinging to the rug.

When I wash my rugs, I take two pans of cold water. In one, I add a tablespoon of liquid laundry detergent. You want laundry detergent, because you don’t need suds (if you use powdered laundry detergent, just make sure you completely dissolve it so you won’t leave any flakes of residue on the rug). In the other pan of water, I add a splash of white vinegar. I put a clean rag or sponge into each pan.

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With the pan of soapy water, I squeeze the rag almost all the way out. You don’t need to get the rug soaking wet, you just need enough moisture to lift up hair and debris that has collected. In a circular motion, I scrub the rug in small sections, following up with a light rinse with the vinegar water. I repeat this process on the back of the rug. Then I leave the rug to air dry.

At times like these, when you are making a close examination of your rug, you may notice some problems, like stains that won’t wash out or areas where the backing has weakened. All of these can be repaired, and I’ll cover that topic in next month’s post.

This month I’ll have a booth at the Puyallup Spring Fair (April 11-14). If you live in the Pacific Northwest, definitely come by and say hi!

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I’ll also be teaching a Beginning Rug Hooking Class at the Spring Fair on Friday, 10-1.

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Little House, 11″x8.5″ Kit includes yarn, wool fabric strips and T-shirt strips

In this class, we’re going to cover hooking with yarn, wool fabric strips and T-shirt strips, so this will be your All-In-One class to get you started with this delightful craft!

Old Books

Old Books, 17″x32″, designed and hand hooked with T-shirts by Judy Taylor

This month’s Featured Rug is one I made for a fundraiser for Hugo House, a writing school in Seattle. It’s hooked with 100% T-shirts. You can read more about it here!

Happy Hooking everyone!

Judy Taylor
http://www.littlehouserugs.com

 

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