Designer Frames?

Christmas tree cropped for web

Proddy Christmas Tree, 9″x5″, Designed and prodded by Judith Stephens

We’ll get to the subject of this post in a second, but first I wanted to share Judith Stephens’ darling Proddy Christmas Tree project. This fun design, along with some of her proddy rugs can be viewed at the Featured Rug of the Month at Little House Rugs. You’ll learn about the history of proddy rugs, and you’ll find the complete instructions to prod one of your very own!

And now to the subject of this posting. A creative customer of mine, Lizzy Palmer, shared a new skill with me that I thought was so darned interesting, I had to give it a try. Some time back, she had seen online instructions for making PVC pipes look like wooden dowels, and just filed that away in her amazing brain for a while. When she constructed my old frame design (Playing Hookey), she knew she had found the perfect project to try her new technique.

playing hookey wood style for web

Playing Hookey Frame, wool effect, by Lizzy Palmer

We tried the same technique using the DeLovely frame design, our new and improved version that lifts the rug up so you don’t have to look down at your lap. (You’ll find everything you need to make your own DeLovely frame here.) But if you want to go real fancy, try this first.

sanding pipe for web

With a power sander (or good old sandpaper and a dab of elbow grease), sand off the printing and barcodes.

scoring pipe 2 for web

Scoring the pipe: My husband Gary found that a coarse-tooth saw worked best for creating grooves in the pipe. He would drag the saw over the pipe, meandering so the lines were uneven, like the grain of a wooden doweling.

Just a note about cutting the pipes: Gary found it easier to do the scoring if the pipes were cut down into manageable lengths. So go ahead and cut up the longer pieces (27″, 22.5″, and 20″) before scoring the pipes, but you’ll want to combine some of the smaller pieces into workable sections before scoring (8″, 6″, 4″, 2.5″, 1.5″ and 1″). Then you can cut them into the suggested lengths after you’ve painted those pipes.

scored pipe for web

Here’s what the pipes look like after scoring (above).

sanding after scoring for web

Sand off any rough edges. Get rid of anything jagged that could snag your rug!

rubbing in paint for web

Then rub one coat of paint into the pipes (I chose Americana Dark Chocolate Acrylic Paint). It naturally appeared darker inside the grooves, adding to the wood look. After everything dried thoroughly, we tested it to make sure it could stand up to moisture, and it did just fine (I wouldn’t leave it out in the rain all night or anything, but if your frame gets a few raindrops on it from the car to the building, I’m confident it won’t wreck the paint job).

painting knobs for web

I used DecoArt Dazzling Metallics Acrylic paint for the fittings (I chose Splendid Gold, but there are other metallic colors to choose from). I found that they needed two coats, so I did it in stages, leaving the bottom section of each unpainted (so I could set them down on the cardboard without sticking). (In the picture above, the fittings have had their first coat, leaving some of the white fitting showing on the bottoms) I would do the next coat, starting with the bottom (unpainted) part, leaving the top unpainted so it could sit on the cardboard without sticking. In this way, I flipped them over each time so everything got two coats. Over time and use, I may need to touch up the fittings or the pipes, but that’s no big deal.

Here’s how the frame turned out. The instructions for making the DeLovely frame include the longer (standing frame) and the shorter (lap frame) legs, so you can switch them out easily. I don’t know if the wood grain comes out clearly online, but the pipes really do look (and feel) like wood (only quite a bit lighter)!

For the normal DeLovely frame, I glue white rubberized shelf liner on the front pipes, but the stuff comes in quite a few colors, so I chose a dark brown for this frame.

So… while we’re on the subject of decorating our frames, Google all the colors you can get that rubberized material in. If you don’t want to bother with the wood effect, there’s nothing saying you couldn’t paint your pipes and fittings any old colors you like! Bird’s egg Blue? Daglo Green? Rainbow stripes? Go for it!

t shirt cover scan for web

I made a dandy YouTube video on Rug Hooking With T-Shirts as a companion to the new book. Check it out. It shows close-up and step-by-step, the basic process of hooking with T-shirts, which is also helpful even if you’re hooking with yarn because we really went in for the detail on this one. You can also watch our award-winning DVD on YouTube called Hooking With Yarn! 

Happy Hooking Everyone!

Judy Taylor
http://www.littlehouserugs.com

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